Nitela borealis ♀︎♂︎

Last update: 22 March 2021
SPECIES: Nitela borealis
GENUS: NITELA
FAMILY: Digger wasps (CRABRONIDAE)



OBSERVATION:
2020-VI-012020-V-312020-V-292020-V-282020-V-202020-V-142019-V-272019-V-24

YEARS:
20192020

MONTHS:
JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec


Official name

Synonyms

Nitela borealis [1]

none

see more on: www.gbif.org

Nitela borealis ♂︎
Nitela borealis ♀︎

CONTENTS

1. Distribution
2. Behaviour
3. Plant relations
4. Parasitic relations
5. Identification

1. DISTRIBUTION

Nitela borealis is a rare [5] digger wasp that can be found throughout the Netherlands [3].

Garden species

In my garden it is a permanent resident and can be found with multiple specimen on the bee hotels and on sunny walls.

2. BEHAVIOUR

2.1. ACTIVITY

The species is active from half May to begin October [3].

2.2. DEVELOPMENT

Nests are made in old beetle tunnels and in dead wood, trunks and poles [3,7].

Bee hotel

The species is active on bee hotels where it also nests [4]. They prefer small bore holes.

Nitela borealis ♀︎
Nitela borealis ♀︎

3. FOOD PLANTS

I did not find any literature references with regards to plant visits.

4. PREY RELATIES

The species uses nymphs of woodlice (Psocoptera) for larval food [3,7]

5. IDENTIFICATION

Length male 3-4 mm [4]
Length female 3-4,5 mm [4]

Genus

The genus Nitela can be identified using the following characters:

1. Small black species [2,6,8]

2. One submarginal cel in frontwing [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♂, frontwing with 1 submarginal cel
Nitela borealis ♂︎, one submarginal cel in front wing

3. Hindwing without clear veins [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♀︎, veins hind wing unclear

4. Inner eye edges converge upwards [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♂, eyes converge upwards
Nitela borealis ♂︎, eyes converge upwards

4. Antennae very low on the head [2]

Nitela borealis ♂︎, antennae set low in the face
Nitela borealis ♂︎, antennae are low in the face
Nitela borealis ♀︎, antennae set low in the face



Nitela borealis ♀︎
Nitela borealis ♀

1. Female with 12 antennal segments and 6 abdomen segments

Nitela borealis ♂︎
Nitela borealis ♂︎
Nitela borealis ♂︎
Nitela borealis ♂︎
Nitela borealis ♀, propodeum dorsally, lower areas between longitudinal carinae glossy and without well defined microsculpture

2. Males with 13 antennal segments and 7 abdomen segments

Nitela borealis ♂, male with 13 antennal segments


&

KOP

1. Vertex in front of ocelli, mesonotum and scutellum punctuated [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♂︎, frons before ocelli punctated

2. Lower indeted part of frons with dense white hairs [8]

Nitela borealis ♂︎, lower indented part frons with dense white hairs

3. Clypeus with strongly developed medial longitudinal keel that almost reaches the front margin [2]

Nitela borealis ♂, Clypeus with strongly developed longitudinal keel
Nitela borealis ♂︎, clypeus with stark shaped medial keel

4. Clypeus with 3 well developed teeth [2]

Nitela borealis ♂, Clypeus with 3 clear teeth
Nitela borealis ♂, Clypeus with 3 clear teeth

5. Cheeks (gena) very finely and densely striped, almost no space and punctation between the stripes [8]

Nitela borealis ♀, cheek (gena) very densely striped

THORAX

1. Mesonotum punctated [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♂︎, Vertex, mesonotum and scutellum punctated

2. Propodeum dorsally smooth with branched carinae [2,6,8], in some specimen partly net-like [2]

3. Propodeum dorsally and space between the carinae shiny [2,6,8], more or less uneven, seldom clearly chagrined (finely scarred) [2]

Nitela borealis ♀, propodeum dorsally, lower areas between longitudinal carinae glossy and without well defined microsculpture
Nitela borealis ♂︎, propodeum dorally with branched longitudinal keels
Nitela borealis ♂︎, propodeum dorally with branched longitudinal keels

ABDOMEN

1. Tergites dorsally without punctation in most specimen [2,6,8]

Nitela borealis ♂︎, tergites dorsally (almost) without punctation

References

1 Nederlands Soortenregister

2 Hermann Dollfuss, "Bestimmungsschlüssel der Grabwespen Nord- und Zentraleuropas (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae) mit speziellen Angaben zur Grabwespenfauna Österreichs", Publikation der Botanischen Arbeitsgemeinschaft am O.Ö.Landesmuseum Linz, LINZ, 20. Dezember 1991

3 Peeters, T.M.J., C. van Achterberg, W.R.B. Heitmans, W.F. Klein, V. Lefeber, A.J. van Loon, A.A. Mabelis, H. Nieuwen-huijsen, M. Reemer, J. de Rond, J. Smit, H.H.W. Velthuis, 2004. De wespen en mieren van Nederland (Hymenoptera: Aculeata). – Nederlandse Fauna 6. Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Naturalis, Leiden, knnv Uitgeverij, Utrecht & European Invertebrate Survey – Nederland, Leiden.

4 Breugel, P. van 2014. Gasten van bijenhotels. – EIS Kenniscentrum Insecten en andere ongewervelden & Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden.

5 Waarneming.nl

6 KLEIN, Wim. De graafwespen van de Benelux. Jeugdbondsuitgeverij, Utrecht, 1996, 1-130. + KLEIN, Wim. De graafwespen van de Benelux: supplement. Jeugdbondsuitgeverij, 1999.

7 Koch, F. (2002), Blösch, M. (2000). Die Grabwespen Deutschlands – Lebens‐weise, Verhalten, Verbreitung. 71. Teil. In Dahl, F.: Die Tierwelt Deutschlands. Begr.: 1925. – Keltern (Goecke & Evers). – 480 S. 341 Farbfotos. ISBN 3‐931374‐26‐2 (hardcover). DM 98,–. Zool. Reihe, 78: 353-353. https://doi.org/10.1002/mmnz.20020780208

8 JACOBS, H. J (2007): Die Grabwespen Deutschlands Ampulicidae. Sphecidae, Crabronidae–Bestimmungsschlüssel in Blank, SM & Taeger, A (Hrsg): Die Tierwelt Deutschlands und der angrenzenden Meeresteile nach ihren Merkmalen und nach ihrer Lebensweise, Hymenoptera III–Keltern, Goecke & Evers, 79: 1-207.

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